“My name is also Daniel Reich, and strange as it seems, I found your blog doing a bing search on my own name.”

This is a damn small world. The Internet makes it that much smaller. Just read the title of this post as proof (or see entire comment here from another Daniel Reich).

For the rest of your life, everything you do and say will be public information and will be easily accessible. You can argue with me all you want but 10 years from now, if by some chance I recall that argument and feel like being in a “I told you so” mood, I’ll be sure to take your most embarrassing picture and make it its own website just to remind you how right I was.

Ok, I probably won’t do that (even though I or anyone else could).

The point is that in today’s world you must control and own your own web presence.

Go to Google, type in your name, see what comes up.

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Death and Failure Happens When You Don’t Properly Assess the Situation

Myself and fellow rescuer assessing the scene and pateint (Mount Snow, Vermont)

This October will mark my 9th consecutive year as an emergency health care professional. In all those years, the most important thing I learned (besides teamwork) is that assessing a situation correctly and completely could literally be the difference between life and death. The “assessment” is the most critical aspect when saving lives, treating the injured, or tending to the ill. Emergency health care or health care in general, is the most seriousness business of all (other than war), and within this business, great “assessment” skills are absolutely necessary.

Now think about your own life for a second. Think about your job, your company, your family, your significant other. How could you improve any one of these things if you spend a little more time observing or assessing, before you act or do anything? Think about the job of a manager, quant, marketer, or salesman? As an example, how much better could a salesperson be if they spent more time understanding a business’ needs, before they blindly push a product onto a prospective client?

With that in mind, consider the following few paragraphs:

As a salesman, you must perform a quick but thorough assessment to identify a prospect’s needs and to provide proper business solutions. Prospect assessment includes many steps and is the most complex skill that you will learn in the field. To make the task easier, it is helpful to identify and discuss the key components and skills of prospect assessment before you learn the entire process.

As you begin your assessment, you must gather and record some key information about the prospect. You will also need to obtain and evaluate the prospect’s vital signs of their business. The failures, struggles, or needs and the history of what occurred before and since you arrived are key pieces of information that you will have to obtain by asking a series of questions. You must also learn about the prospect’s past history and overall health of the business.”

Gathering Key Prospect Information

You will need to know which questions to ask and how to ask them. By using your deductive powers, you will be able to interpret the meaning and implications of your findings and the information that you have gathered. When assessing the prospect, you will have to look, listen, feel, and think.

If you couldn’t tell, this excerpt was actually taken from an Emergency Health care manual, with a few words changed. (Outdoor Emergency Care, Comprehensive Prehospital Care for Nonurban Settings, 4th Edition). The real excerpt is below.

Point is, you can’t possibly solve a problem or address an issue, without fully understanding the problem in the first place. In health care, this could possibly mean death. In business and in relationships, this could possibly mean failure.

Think, assess, and only after, act.

“As a rescuer, you must perform a quick but thorough assessment to identify a patients needs and to provide proper emergency care. Patient assessment includes many steps and is the most complex skill that you will learn in the OEC (Outdoor Emergency Care) course. To make the task easier, it is helpful to identify and discuss the key components and skills of patient assessment before you learn the entire process.

As you begin your assessment, you must gather and record some key information about the patient. You will also need to obtain and evaluate the patient’s vital signs. The injuries, illnesses, or symptoms and the history of what occurred before and since you arrived are key pieces of information that you will have to obtain by asking a series of questions. You must also learn about the patient’s past medical history and overall health.”

“Gathering Key Patient Information

You will need to know which questions to ask and how to ask them. By using your deductive powers, you will be able to interpret the meaning and implications of your findings and the information that you have gathered. When assessing the patient, you will have to look, listen, feel, and think.”

(Outdoor Emergency Care, Comprehensice Prehospital Care for Nonurban Settings, 4th Edition)

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